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S.D.
09-02-2009, 01:00 PM
I was reminded about this recently. I did author this topic before, at The Heirophant, but it's a fun little subject, so here are some thoughts on the actor Gene Wilder, in relation to Manson's work.

Several of Manson's favoured cultural reference points and influences have featured Wilder, either as a main character, or a supporting role. Obviously, the most significant of these is Willy Wonka, in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, nods and outright tributes to which are to be found all over the initial Spooky Kids and Portrait of an American Family eras of Marilyn Manson. It seems unnecessary, but I shall illustrate with a visual nonetheless, just to consolidate the topic.


http://i403.photobucket.com/albums/pp112/providermodule/Analysis/Wonka.jpg


Also, Manson's "Child Catcher" character from the front cover of Smells Like Children can be interpreted as embodying Wonka also, given the top hat, (stop hated?) and also that Manson has commented on the dual nature of Willy Wonka in print before:-


"It's a character that I've always identified with and who I paid tribute to on Portrait of an American Family by recreating the boat ride scene as an intro to the album. If I could be any one other character I would love to be Willy Wonka, even if it was just so I could see up Veruca Salt's skirt. He's the most enigmatic character in a Children's film. He was both Christ and Satan." - Marilyn Manson, 2001


The links to Wilder's Wonka are fairly evident, and Manson has oft cited it as his favourite film, but there are other movies that are worth attention. During EAT ME, DRINK ME, on Putting Holes In Happiness, three cultural icons are mentioned.


"If you're Bonnie I'll be your Clyde"


Bonnie And Clyde, the 1967 film about criminals Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker, also features Gene Wilder in his first film role as "Eugene". The scene can be viewed here:-



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HU8egqDF1A


The gang force Eugene and his girlfriend off the road in their vehicle, and during conversation he is shocked to find that she is 33 years old, evidently incongruous with whatever age she has told him she is, meaning both literally and metaphorically, their love could be just a car crash away...

The other cultural reference point of Putting Holes In Happiness is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein --- "Blow out the candles, on all my Frankensteins". This is significant, amusingly, to Wilder's role in the Mel Brooks comedy, Young Frankenstein, in which he plays the title role, Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, grandson of the book's original protagonist. The role, not only by title default, but also by sketch comparison, is amusing, because one scene which features discourse between Frederick and housekeeper Frau Blücher sees her tell he and his assistants to "stay close to the candles", when ascending a staircase. The viewer will at this point note that the candles she holds are not even lit, which is noted visually by the other characters.


http://i403.photobucket.com/albums/pp112/providermodule/Analysis/YoungFrankenstein.jpg


Candles are used for comedic purposes on several occasions during the film, most notably when Frankenstein's "Monster", burns his finger on one after misunderstanding a directive about cigars.

Even though I was previously under the impression that it was a composite moniker for comedy purposes in the film, Blücher also refers to Frederick as "Herr Doktor", which although I later discovered to be a genuine,though ambiguous German medical term of address, still provides an amusing link to the "character" Manson plays on The Golden Age of Grotesque...

Also, as an aside, Wilder played the role of the Mock Turtle in the 1999 Television adaptation of Alice's Adventures In Wonderland:-


http://i403.photobucket.com/albums/pp112/providermodule/Analysis/MockWilder.jpg

spaceSuicide
09-02-2009, 02:27 PM
Quite a bit of references actually, they always add up. It's like when you find one thing that mirrors or is referred to in Manson you have a trickling faucet that shows you more and more similarities and comparisons.

The Empirical Guy
09-03-2009, 11:14 PM
"It's a character that I've always identified with and who I paid tribute to on Portrait of an American Family by recreating the boat ride scene as an intro to the album. If I could be any one other character I would love to be Willy Wonka, even if it was just so I could see up Veruca Salt's skirt. He's the most enigmatic character in a Children's film. He was both Christ and Satan." - Marilyn Manson, 2001

Thanks for that, I hadn't seen that quote before. Gave me a chuckle. As always, good finds. I've mentioned it before but for it's relevance to this thread I'll again mention Manson's current fascination with "et cetera" with Gene Wilder reading the contract at the end of Willy Wonka.

S.D.
09-03-2009, 11:25 PM
Yes, I really admire your identification of that quote, especially in terms of the commentary it makes on legalities. Legality ["I want my lawyer"] is something that has been a more common fixture in Manson's life in the last few years, not only in his divorce, but also in the ongoing Stephen Bier case, where the minutiae and contractual obligations seem to contradict the claims laid against Manson.

And the quote about Willy Wonka was part of a series of "villains" Manson identified with in a 2000 issue of Kerrang!. I'm in the process of archiving the pages of it I still have, so I shall let you know when they're done.

S.D.
10-30-2012, 08:01 PM
It's okay, only three years have passed since the last time I added to my topic, I'll waver this being a double-post-ban...

Besides the fact that subliminal, light-based imagery is a staple in the Manson canon, there's something quite nifty in the Veruca Salt Oompa Loompa song from Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory in relation to Holy Wood. Some of you will know that the Marilyn Manson typography for that album was adapted from the original Disneyworld logo, I've mentioned it here a few times and there's the Holy Wars (http://www.providermodule.com/media/?v=i/2000/metaledge) interview where Manson references it specifically.
However, I noticed last month that when the Oompa Loompas sing "You know exactly who's to blame. The Mother and the Father", the flashscreen shows the words 'Mother' and 'Father' in a font not too disimilar from the Blackletter variation Holy Wood employed:-


http://providermodule.com/Administrators/S.D./hw_mother_father.png

http://providermodule.com/Administrators/S.D./hw_mm_wonka.png

I like this from a Holy Wood angle also, considering The Love Song, and its sociological characterisations of 'Mother' and 'Father'.
As ever, tangential if that's what the viewer chooses to see, but a fun observation whether intentional or not.

brian219
11-02-2012, 05:57 PM
Neat. Never noticed the Disneyland font before. Looks like Disneyland Resort still uses a version of the old Blackletter logo:

http://eventservices.disney.go.com/files/11146023.jpg

Sans Agendum
11-02-2012, 06:28 PM
Found this.

"I'm on my way down now, I'd like to take you with me" (but i can't because the elevator is broken)

http://gallery.mailchimp.com/1169c5dcc6f48e53059e4e2e8/images/Ruca.1.png

Golden Eel
11-05-2012, 12:07 AM
This thread is fucking retarded.

Hazekiah
11-05-2012, 01:05 AM
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQBIlbWG6sMPwmOIi5MzjGNU0VaFQ2J0 FA8HU1QSSU3IWsA3fJRdhva1NIs

brian219
11-07-2012, 09:10 PM
This thread is fucking retarded.

It needs 100% more Jeff Goldblum.