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Jakob Synn
04-04-2010, 01:39 PM
This quote is featured at the end of the Bon Harris/Pogo remix of The Love Song and for the longest time I've always wondered where the sample came from.

Help?

Sputnik
04-04-2010, 04:19 PM
I've never actually heard that remix... :(

S.D.
04-07-2010, 02:27 PM
You know, I've wondered about this plenty of times, I think it might actually be something they recorded in-studio, it could easily be Gacy's voice with an effect on it, because it doesn't seem to have a sample source cited in the single's sleeve notes, I'm looking at it in front of me now and it just states Harris and Gacy doing the song.
Was this also not the same mix done to the Fibonacci time-pattern? Neither 12 or 78 are Fibonacci numbers, so it isn't some numerical reference.
I've written the dialogue from the song out here, in the order it appears.

Voice 1. - "Music that began with a fanfare of thundering drums. Music that enflamed people, a wild patriotic fervour."
Voice 2. - "12 Dollars. 78 Cents"
Voice 1. - "Machine Gun [or guns?]"
Voice 2. - "12 Dollars. 78 Cents"
Voice 1. - "Mountains of human corpses"
Manson - "Yeah! Yeah!"
Voice 1. - "They found that music could help incite fiends like me-e [or "these"?]"
" *Illegible* ...the desire to kill"
"Killing. Rape Kill!"
Manson - "Do you love your guns? Yeah! god? Yeah! Goverment? Fuck yeah!"
Manson - "We got love songs in our head, killing us away"
Voice 2. - "12 Dollars, and 78 Cents, to rock the World..."

I think (and this is just a personal interpretation) that the dialogue is supposed to represent killing for a price, and a low one at that. Also, in the interview Gacy did with Boyd Rice in 2003, Rice asked him what he thought about Klebold and Harris, and Columbine, and he said this:-


"Ultimately, the music they listened to had nothing to do with what they did.
I wish music was that powerful."


So I think perhaps there is also commentary in there (from Gacy's perspective) about how music is used as a scapegoat for people to kill others, but would it be the same if music really was able to do this?
It seems like Voice 1. is almost trying to justify murder and war by using war-drums as a reason for people's "fervour" when they take arms, when that plainly isn't the case. Perhaps Voice 2. is a more sober reminder that people don't need art to kill, a few dollars would be enough, which I suppose strangely reflects sentiments from Manson years later about how "money is modern fascism" [paraphrased], when talking about [I]Pretty As A Swastika.
Also, during Antichrist Superstar, Manson elaborated that if he wanted to end the world all it would take was a bullet in the head, because by killing yourself, you "destroy the world and everyone else at the same time" - which is the basis for The Reflecting God - an idea that I think re-surfaced on King Kill 33. Compare lyrics from both songs:-


"Scar, scar, can you feel my power? One shot and the world gets smaller"
"But I have to show you that you played a role, and I will destroy you with one simple hole"


Incidentally, they're both the penultimate song on their respective albums. I'd say that "rock the world" could also be interpreted outside of the musical sense, and it's saying 12 Dollars and 78 Cents is the price of death, ending someone's "world"; The Kennedy Assassination, Columbine, et al:-


http://www.providermodule.com/discography/images/disc_main_fs1.jpg

Shangri-LIE
04-07-2010, 02:35 PM
Machine Guns



I will do some research on it later on. However I believe that it was inspired by a (unkown at the moment) reference to a patriotic song, or hymn during the American Revolution. That's a good starting point anyway. Though I don't think that the samples are related to one isolated source.




The Hidden Hand "one pound of human flesh"

S.D.
04-07-2010, 03:20 PM
Machine Guns

I will do some research on it later on. However I believe that it was inspired by a (unkown at the moment) reference to a patriotic song, or hymn during the American Revolution.

I believe that's actually the other remix from the single you're thinking of; Jesus Loves The Little Children (adapted from a Civil War marching tune, which makes me think of "We're a death marching band") was used in Bon Harris's mix of Disposable Teens.
Before it had words the song was called Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, The Boys Are Marching; perhaps mirroring footage of Klebold and Harris marching on the students of Columbine, 'trampling' them down. The words were later written by a preacher named Clare Herbert Woolston, and one section, reading "Jesus is the Shepherd true", reminds us that the Shepherd sacrifices the "Lamb of God"...
I personally find the song's assertion to the children it addresses a little unnerving, as it states that Jesus died for them (it doesn't use the word sin, only that he died...), and that "Jesus calls the children", implying that to be closer to Jesus, children should kill themselves...

Shangri-LIE
04-07-2010, 04:08 PM
I believe that's actually the other remix from the single you're thinking of; Jesus Loves The Little Children (adapted from a Civil War marching tune, which makes me think of "We're a death marching band") was used in Bon Harris's mix of Disposable Teens.
Before it had words the song was called Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, The Boys Are Marching; perhaps mirroring footage of Klebold and Harris marching on the students of Columbine, 'trampling' them down. The words were later written by a preacher named Clare Herbert Woolston, and one section, reading "Jesus is the Shepherd true", reminds us that the Shepherd sacrifices the "Lamb of God"...
I personally find the song's assertion to the children it addresses a little unnerving, as it states that Jesus died for them (it doesn't use the word sin, only that he died...), and that "Jesus calls the children", implying that to be closer to Jesus, children should kill themselves...

That's possible. I wish I had something more concrete, and definite to anchor this thread to. It's odd that you created this thread, because I have been walking around muttering "machiiiiinnne gunnnnns" latley, though that is completely irrelevent. As for the connotations of the song, it is a bit disturbing. Good topic, S.D.

It's something worth looking into.

Rxcore
08-08-2010, 06:58 AM
BUMp

Just noticed this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v281/SquiffyRx/27f326c7.jpg

The Empirical Guy
08-08-2010, 07:38 AM
Excellent fucking find!

ThreeEyedGod
08-09-2010, 02:25 AM
Mystery solved. Zoinks!

Cassandra
08-09-2010, 08:56 PM
Awesome catch!

[god]speed
08-09-2010, 09:34 PM
Browse guys, Browse! It would save time ;P Good to see that Rx found the same thing tho.





February 18th, 2010

$12.78

$12.78 Italian Carbine Rifle
Based on the Rape of The World Tour poster for Dallas (as shown right) $12.78 references the price of the 6.5 Italian Carbine Rifle that Oswald used to assassinate JFK in Dealey Plaza
http://www.mansonwiki.com/w/images/thumb/b/b6/DallasPrint.jpg/180px-DallasPrint.jpg




$12.78 To Rock The World (http://www.mansonwiki.com/wiki/The_Love_Song_(Bon_Harris_Remix)#.2412.78)

Doppelgänger
08-11-2010, 05:53 AM
BUMp

Just noticed this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v281/SquiffyRx/27f326c7.jpg

awesome spot! shit like this is cool, and it was dallas they played as well.