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red.
11-30-2013, 12:54 PM
I'd like to start off by saying I know that there is a lot of material stating which books influenced Manson, especially nachtkabarett.com. I even tried to look for a similar thread on PM but did not find anything.
Nonetheless, I thought it would be a good idea to have a threat listing every piece of work that was ever mentioned in the albums, feel free to contribute please!
I'd like to start off by putting some material that I could find on Nachtkabarett:
http://www.nachtkabarett.com/AlchemyandKabbalah

Alchemy & Mysticism: The Hermetic Museum (http://myphilosofia.com/creative-blog/art-design-craft/the-hermetic-museum-alchemy-mysticism/#.UpvZacTEOF4) by Alexander Roob
The Alchemists by F. Sherwood Taylor (http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Alchemists.html?id=yZdHUsTkldMC) (OUT OF PRINT)
The Arts Of The Alchemists by C. A. Burland (OUT OF PRINT)
The Tree Of Life: An Illustrated Study in Magic (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/406212.The_Tree_of_Life) by Israel Regardie, Third Edition
The Tetragrammaton (http://www.amazon.com/Tetragrammaton-Evoking-Angelic-Apocalypse-Llewellyns/dp/1567187447) by Donald Tyson (http://www.nachtkabarett.com/AlchemyAndKabbalah/Tetragrammaton)
New Millenium Magic (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/440238.New_Millennium_Magic_) by Donald Tyson
Enochian Magic for Beginnners (http://www.amazon.com/Enochian-Magic-Beginners-Original-Llewellyns/dp/1567187471) by Donald Tyson
The Key Of Solomon the King (Clavicula Salomonis) (http://www.esotericarchives.com/solomon/ksol.htm) by S. Liddell MacGregor Mathers



http://www.nachtkabarett.com/ArtAndTheGoldenAgeOfGrotesque

The Tragic Life Of Toulouse-Lautrec by Lawrence & Elizabeth Hanson (OUT OF PRINT)
Degas/Lautrec : Painters Of Parisian Life (http://www.amazon.com/Degas-Lautrec-Painters-Parisian-Life/dp/B000LUT2CG) by Keith Roberts (OUT OF PRINT)
Toulouse-Lautrec by Richard Stone (OUT OF PRINT)
Otto Dix by Eva Karcher
Otto Dix : Metropolis published by Fondation Maeght (OUT OF PRINT)
"Degenerate Art" The Fate Of The Avant-Garde In Nazi Germany by Stephanie Barron, published by LACMA (OUT OF PRINT)
Lustmord by Maria Tatar
Voluptuous Panic : The Erotic World Of Weimar Berlin by Mel Gordon (OUT OF PRINT)
Dada, Surrealim, And Their Heritage by William S. Rubin (OUT OF PRINT)
Aubrey Beardsley : A Slave To Beauty by David Colvin
The Early Work Of Aubrey Beardsley published by Dover
The Hot Girls Of Weimar Berlin by Barbara Ulrich


http://www.nachtkabarett.com/NietzscheOccult

Agrippa, Henry Cornelius. Three Books Of Occult Philosophy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_occulta_philosophia_libri_tres). Trans. D. Tyson. Ed. J. Freake. Llewellyn Publications: Minnesota, 1998.
777 And Other Qabalistic Writings Of Aleister Crowley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/777_and_Other_Qabalistic_Writings_of_Aleister_Crow ley). Ed. I. Regardie. Samuel Weiser, Inc.: Maine, 2000.
Flowers, Stephen E. Lords Of The Left Hand Path (http://www.amazon.com/Lords-Left-Hand-Path-Forbidden-Practices/dp/1594774676). Runa-Raven Press: Texas, 1997.
Halevi, Z'ev Ben Shimon. The Way Of Kabbalah (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/841510.Way_of_the_Kabbalah). Samuel Weiser, Inc.: Maine, 1976.
Nietzsche, Friedrich. Thus Spake Zarathustra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra). Trans. R.J. Hollingdale. Penguin Books: Maryland, 1972.




Fahrenheit 451 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit_451) by Ray Bradbury
Diary of a Drug Fiend (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diary_of_a_Drug_Fiend)by Aleister Crowley
Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfume_(novel)) by Patrick Suskind
The Cat in the Hat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_in_the_hat) by Dr. Seuss
1984 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteen_Eighty-Four) by George Orwell
Macbeth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macbeth)by Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliette (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romeo_and_Juliet) by Shakespeare
Lolita (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lolita)by Vladimir Nabokov
The Bible (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible)
Brave New World (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brave_New_World) by Aldous Huxley

M Tragedy666
11-30-2013, 03:31 PM
Lest we forget "Lolita" and much by Shakespeare, particularly Macbeth and Romeo and Juliette.

Also, books by Anton LaVey, what was that book that inspired Smells Like Children? The list goes on.

red.
11-30-2013, 03:39 PM
thanks, that's basically the point of the thread!
let's keep it going!

Lucille
11-30-2013, 07:26 PM
Lest we forget "Lolita" and much by Shakespeare, particularly Macbeth and Romeo and Juliette.

Also, books by Anton LaVey, what was that book that inspired Smells Like Children? The list goes on.

The Cat In the Hat?

MrBonestripper
12-01-2013, 02:40 AM
at first i read the thread title as "books shaped like marilyn manson"
i had to do a double take
i think maybe i secretly want them
hehe

anyways

i believe perfume
by Patrick Süskind/John E. Woods

is another

i think i remember marilyn talkin about it
around holywood/golden age
or somethin
maybe sooner or later

what a great spine ticklin story!!
hot
dog

oh my geez, im a gettin tired
my eye lids are a droopin
n stutterin
.
kids
i need to get some shut eye!

Angel of Sorrow
12-01-2013, 12:00 PM
The Bible. He seemed to use that a lot at one point. lol I do believe I either read or heard him say that he does read it periodically.

Alterkaker66
12-01-2013, 04:42 PM
If he wasn't influenced by American Psycho I'd be very surprised.

TH15x15xMYxOMeGA
12-01-2013, 05:30 PM
Something that would improve this thread (sorry Pasha haha) would maybe be to actually cite what the book influenced in Manson's work. Some are obvious, such as Diary of a Drug Fiend by Aleister Crowley (reading that right now), but if it isn't obvious maybe we should give a specific reference. This could get interesting. I'll start.

Courtesy of my boyfriend, the wonderful OP, red., I read the original V For Vendetta comics. I've never heard anywhere of Manson saying he read these, but I did find a lot of things in the book that were similar to Manson's work. For example, on one page, V says "Anarchy wears two faces, both creator and destroyer. Thus destroyers topple empires; make a canvas of clean rubble where creators can then build a better world." This obviously could relate to "Creator, preserver, destroyer" line in Hey, Cruel World...
I know it was said somewhere in a thread a while ago that "creator, preserver, destroyer" came from the Trimurti in Hinduism (Wikipedia it if you need to), and I believe that is the direct reference. V For Vendetta was probably referencing that. However, seeing it in V For Vendetta in the context it is used is interesting because to me, Hey, Cruel World sounds like sort of a challenge in some ways. When Manson says "You don't have what it takes", I always thought of that as a sort of challenging lyric, sort of challenging people to do something. Like Manson seems to be saying in that song how the world is kind of unresponsive or something. Maybe this is a stretch, but there could be a chance that Manson has read V For Vendetta. In the book, V is trying to get people to rise up, and maybe that is what Manson is trying to say too, because the Trimurti isn't really a challenging concept in my opinion. Maybe Manson was referencing both? There were also a few other Manson-y parts to V For Vendetta that I'll try to find when I get the time. I'm supposed to be doing Biology quizzes right now.

Anyway, I recently read Fahrenheit 451 (also courtesy of red.) and found some references in there. I would have to come back to that one though because I can't remember any specifics off the top of my head.

OmegasTits
12-01-2013, 05:45 PM
TH15x15xMYxOMeGA: Have you read 1984 yet? If not, I highly recommend that before most other works. If you don't know the basic idea, it's generally a novel about a complete authoritative government, which I think is touched on in Holywood. It also introduced the idea of limiting human thinking by reducing words in the English language itself so people literally have more difficulty thinking for themselves. It's scary and totally fucked, but one of my favorite books.

TH15x15xMYxOMeGA
12-01-2013, 06:01 PM
I have read it, and it's one of my favorites!!! Definitely one of the best books I've ever read. I remember reading some things in the book that were really directly related to Manson's work, but again I can't think of anything off the top of my head. I have V For Vendetta, Fahrenheit 451, and 1984 in the same room as me right now, so I can get to writing specific references here either later tonight or sometime this week.

OmegasTits
12-01-2013, 06:32 PM
Fahrenheit 451 is my favorite Bradbury classic! Never gets old, I've read a few of his short stories as well.

Lucille
12-01-2013, 07:22 PM
I'll never forget, shortly after studying 1984 in high school and reading it for the first time (and falling in love with it), I heard ACSS and got soo excited when I heard "From a dead man, greetings" in Minute of Decay. That experience led me on a Manson literature reference treasure hunt that lasted a long time. haha

TH15x15xMYxOMeGA
12-01-2013, 09:10 PM
I remember one now! In 1984, I forgot what the context , but someone describes another as "A rebel from the waist downwards".

Lucille
12-01-2013, 10:09 PM
I remember one now! In 1984, I forgot what the context , but someone describes another as "A rebel from the waist downwards".

It's the two main characters. They're rebels from the waist down because they go off to secretly screw every now and then, even though it is forbidden (or something to that affect).

There are 1984 references all throughout the triptych. "From a dead man, greetings." "Our confessions will be televised" "Rebels from the waist down" I'm sure there are probably more I'm just too lazy to remember.

Halo Infinity
01-06-2014, 10:46 PM
Perhaps Charlie and the Chocolate Factory? (I just checked to see if it mentioned, even as a guess, and it surprisingly wasn't.) And well, it's just a guess, which still seem to be very likely.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_and_the_Chocolate_Factory

Oh yes... and Dr. Seuss books in general? =P

Mexicanfiend
01-08-2014, 09:14 AM
Why hasn't Nietzsche been mentioned in here? And I'd add all the quotes used for The long Hard Road Out Of Hell, but I don't have it at hand.

absinthe bunny
01-19-2014, 03:18 AM
The book Valley Of The Dolls was in his/Rose's hotelroom during the MA tour in a hotel in Prague.

Mexicanfiend
01-19-2014, 10:36 AM
The book Valley Of The Dolls was in his/Rose's hotelroom during the MA tour in a hotel in Prague.

The valley of the dolls is the valle of death ;)

Two Faced Egg (23)
02-02-2015, 10:07 AM
Feral House publications - Apocalypse Culture I & Apocalypse Culture II , Great Books , Full of Essays from diVerse Degenerate Minds, I own both ..but Really want Apocalypse Culture I 1st edition, It has Full text of Hoffman & James Shelby Downard'Ss - "King Kill 33"

MistressOfClouds
02-22-2015, 09:18 AM
Are the books mentioned on The Nachtkabarett books MM himself has mentioned, or are those books used by the authors of the NK to write their essays?

I have been asking myself a petty little question for some time now: What about the legal aspects of citing books, very few people have heard of? I know that there is some money paid to the respective studios if samples from their movies are used. But did MM pay money to whoever holds the rights to Crowleys Diary of a Dope Fiend and all other works he is citing? What about taking one single term like "Narcissus Narcosis" from Wilson Bryan Key? (See the thread in the PE subforum.)

While it is fun to go on this intellectual treasure hunts MM provides us, I can't help to feel a little disappointment when I learn that a phrase or term (e.g. the mentioned Narcissus Nercosis, or the rebel from the waist down) that I liked especially, isn't his own idea after all. It doesn't really impair the quality of Manson's work or my respect for him, but does anyone else feel that way sometimes?

YoureAlreadyHere
08-25-2015, 10:35 AM
Are the books mentioned on The Nachtkabarett books MM himself has mentioned, or are those books used by the authors of the NK to write their essays?

I have been asking myself a petty little question for some time now: What about the legal aspects of citing books, very few people have heard of? I know that there is some money paid to the respective studios if samples from their movies are used. But did MM pay money to whoever holds the rights to Crowleys Diary of a Dope Fiend and all other works he is citing? What about taking one single term like "Narcissus Narcosis" from Wilson Bryan Key? (See the thread in the PE subforum.)

While it is fun to go on this intellectual treasure hunts MM provides us, I can't help to feel a little disappointment when I learn that a phrase or term (e.g. the mentioned Narcissus Nercosis, or the rebel from the waist down) that I liked especially, isn't his own idea after all. It doesn't really impair the quality of Manson's work or my respect for him, but does anyone else feel that way sometimes?

I can't provide any insight into works' citing and legality, but in regards to your second paragraph, no; I never feel deflated that Manson has borrowed or referenced an idea or piece of work. If anything, it is enthralling. I will forever be grateful that he has shared so many different things with his audience. In my opinion, it doesn't make him unoriginal because he alters the subject to make it his own, in a way, and he breathes life into old art that shouldn't be forgotten/brushed off.

MistressOfClouds
09-16-2015, 06:43 AM
You have a point.
And after all, I really admire his knowledge on all those different subjects. I sometimes wonder how someone who has been prorducing music and touring non-stop (especially in the 90s) can find the time to read that much.
Manson is always a good source if I want something interesting to read or watch, that no one I know has ever heard of.

TMC
12-27-2015, 10:55 AM
There has been at least two obvious cases of Manson being inspired by Palahniuk.

The first one is Born Again where Manson sings


the valley of the dolls is
the valley of the dead

Which is most possibly a reference to the ending of Fight Club and the main characters comparison of a mental institution to "The Valley of the Dolls playset".


They bring you your meals on a tray with a paper cup of meds.
The Valley of the Dolls playset.

There is another reference on The Pale Emperor which I discovered while reading Lullaby. In the book, there's a following line:


You kill strangers deliberately so you don't accidentally kill the people you love.

While in the opening song, Killing Strangers, Manson sings:


We're killing strangers, we're killing strangers
We're killing strangers, so we don't kill the ones that we love.

The Overman
12-27-2015, 11:05 AM
The Valley Of The Dolls was also a 1967 picture starring Manson Family victim Sharon Tate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_of_the_Dolls) (and written by perennial film critic Roger Ebert) which I tend to think is the primary reference in "Born Again". Sharp thinking, though.

Mok
12-28-2015, 03:23 PM
Great find!

YoureAlreadyHere
12-30-2015, 08:41 AM
Thought I'd share this here considering recent convo
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81YS9egzy2L.jpg book by Jacqueline Susann, noted as being in Manson & Rose's hotel room during MA (unsure if the book was this edition, as the covers vary)
http://thumbs.ebaystatic.com/images/g/DBUAAOSwCQNWfE5j/s-l225.jpg


Also, love the palahniuk killing strangers bit... love palahniuk <3