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Thread: What Are You Reading?

  1. #641
    Enname's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absolution View Post
    My latest addition in a long line of eccentric reading material is The Gnostic Bible, by Willis Barnstone and Marvin Meyer. It is fucking lit.
    It is a great introduction to not only the Nag Hammadi Library, but I appreciate that they threw in one of the Islamic mystics as well. I am however not very pleased with their representation of the Albigensian (Cathar) sources, because omfg so problematic and the weirdest translation of the Book of Two Principles ever.
    Quid ignorantia sit multi ignorant.

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  3. #642
    YoureAlreadyHere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absolution View Post
    My latest addition in a long line of eccentric reading material is The Gnostic Bible, by Willis Barnstone and Marvin Meyer. It is fucking lit.
    there is always a first
    --------------------------------

    Don't tell me what to do.

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  5. #643
    Absolution's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enname View Post
    It is a great introduction to not only the Nag Hammadi Library, but I appreciate that they threw in one of the Islamic mystics as well. I am however not very pleased with their representation of the Albigensian (Cathar) sources, because omfg so problematic and the weirdest translation of the Book of Two Principles ever.
    This is my first dive into gnosticism after being introduced to it by Jung so I don't really know what you're talking about haha, but I'll keep it in mind while reading!

  6. #644
    Married to Suedehead Shangri-LIE's Avatar
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    Winding back the clock and filling in some script logic gaps, or much rather "Rooting out and eliminating dead wood" so to speak. (The Rose Technique - lol). Back to being a book worm, only this time carrying a tool kit along with those who have dared taking pruning sheers to the mentality of boring, dull lecture hall attending golems who are too easily molded by pop psychology/pop sciences. A type of student that I used to be. I'm reading two books at the same time that could both be considered counterparts yet contain drastic counterpoints for me to ping pong their contents back and forth in my mind. Tweaking and restoring my erudition back to a state of buoyancy again. And I'm only reading books on these subject matters as apparently I'm an idiot. I'm an arrogant, patronizing loser with too much time on my hands, so I fuck with morons all day. Anyway.... Here are the two books that I am reading currently to correct that behavior.

    The illustrated, updated & expanded edition of "A Brief History of Time" by Stephen Hawking as well as "The Omniverse" by Alfred Lambremont Webre.

    P.S. Children have plastic brains. Fact.
    Last edited by Shangri-LIE; 10-12-2017 at 12:06 PM.
    OMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOM


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  8. #645

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    Raven : The Untold Story of Jim Jones and His People by Tim Reiterman, John Jacobs

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  10. #646
    Enname's Avatar
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    Erik Larson, The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

    A surprisingly early entry into the realm of creative non fiction-crime, a genre that is incredibly popular now with His Bloody Project winning a whole lot of prizes last year. This is not nearly as technically magnificent as HBP, but I enjoyed it. As a historian I kind of want to sit Mr Larson down and give him a stern talking to about his research methods and how to not get stuck with only 'HISTORICAL FACT DUMP' and 'CHARACTER DUMP' modes, but that is beside the point. The murders woven throughout was possibly the best and most naturally written part, along with some of the descriptions of the the White City. Plus I learnt things, which is always a bonus. Be interesting to see if the film can make this a bit more of a natural fit.

    Han Kang, Human Acts.

    This book is distressing, beautiful and made me cry. I'd read the one that won her (and her translator) the Man Booker Prize and it was creepy, unsettling and astoundingly beautiful (the imagery of the forest at the end!). This one though is my favourite of hers. The blurb says it is a testament to 'forgiveness and the survival of the human spirit.' Not sure what book they read, but what I got was more about the eternal horror of the humanity and the trauma we inflict. It is set during and after the Gwangju massacre of 1980 - when the South Korean Army suppressed a student uprising and brutally killed 600+ civilians. Follows the point of view of several of the students and is both beautiful and left me breathless in its horror. As one student-torture victim notes in his chapter, 'some memories never heal. Rather than fading with the passage of time, those memories become the only things left behind when all else is abraded. The world darkens, like electric bulbs going out one by one.'
    Last edited by Enname; 12-02-2017 at 05:18 PM.
    Quid ignorantia sit multi ignorant.

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  12. #647
    Married to Shangri-LIE Suedehead's Avatar
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    'Lives of the Monster Dogs' - Kirsten Bakis.

    Heteroclite, sociopathic German scientist genetically engineers some pooches with opposable thumbs and surgically implanted larynxes but it all goes horribly pear shaped when he snuffs it and they're left to their own devices. It's psychotomimetic and surreal and never coerces its allegorical implications, of which there are many. Not completed yet (and I've heard it's climax is disappointing) but I would recommend.

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  14. #648
    Enname's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suedehead View Post
    'Lives of the Monster Dogs' - Kirsten Bakis.

    Heteroclite, sociopathic German scientist genetically engineers some pooches with opposable thumbs and surgically implanted larynxes but it all goes horribly pear shaped when he snuffs it and they're left to their own devices. It's psychotomimetic and surreal and never coerces its allegorical implications, of which there are many. Not completed yet (and I've heard it's climax is disappointing) but I would recommend.
    Sounds like it might suffer a bit from first book syndrome - great idea, but the execution fades as the initial idea wears off and becomes harder to resolve. Still looks interesting. Will see if I can find it.


    Reading:
    Anne Carson - Autobiography of Red
    Anne Carson - Red Doc>
    John Donne - Collected Works

    I am in the mood for poetry right now because it freezes my thoughts and makes them march to its cadence. In particular I have been revisiting Anne Carson, Canadian poet and translator of Greek plays. The basic premise of her Autobiography of Red is the tenth labour of Herakles and the monster Geryon. The fragments of Stesichorus's poem are infused into the modern period, where Geryon (a red winged monster) is a lost boy who falls in love with the hero Herakles. It is a novel written in poetry. Red Doc> is the follow up, I suppose. Where Herakles is now Sad but Great, a soldier with PTSD and Prometheus is in a clinic that is run by the Minotaur. None of it is remotely as funny as the summary makes it sound, and the poetry is blazingly hot and unstoppable across your mind. Got to love Greek translators though, they know how to use a grammatical and structural chiasmus like no other.

    Example:

    Wife of Brain

    hits the floor if a Truck
    backfires can't
    stand
    the smell of diesel or rain in May you ever see
    their orders were to mow the children no one
    let A pig in the shape of a down pig Bleed would he
    Ever let a pig bleed to
    spared such evening your nightfall bleed drugs in
    they
    come with the death in a padded bleed
    he said sweet
    mean I have to
    Let the pain the blades the steeds the brittle children
    carving
    Vicodin methadone Paxil let a big X
    Drank
    out a nightfall across his belly
    let Cut
    sweet Out
    the pain out
    Last edited by Enname; 12-05-2017 at 07:03 PM.
    Quid ignorantia sit multi ignorant.

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  16. #649
    Raspberry Syncope FeedYourHead's Avatar
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    @Enname Can you be more specific about John Donne? Why dost thou thus?


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  18. #650
    HEAVEN UPSIDE DOWN Hazekiah's Avatar
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    I'm reasonably certain her answer will be an emphatic YES, lol.

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