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Thread: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

  1. #21
    Enigma's Avatar
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Quote Originally Posted by Cringeon
    Enigma, no need to throw attacks. sugarbaby is absolutely entitled to their own opinion, especially since they expressed it in a calm manner, and even said it just comes down to personal tastes.
    Not really an attack, it was more a "joke", because people always say the same about it. Since when is GAoG childish? How can anybody think (S)aint, This is The New Shit or even The Bright Young Things are childish? I know it's all a matter of taste, of course, and everyone's free to like whatever they want, but I find the album mature. "He's talking about himself in his songs, how immature!". I don't think it goes this way.

    Anyways, sorry if I sounded offensive : P

    Cause it breaks my heart that we live this way

  2. #22
    DecayingSinner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    The whole Golden Age seems like it was just yesterday. Holy Wood is still my absolute favorite Manson album. GAOG was such a different direction I fell in love with in every aspect (loved the look, music, lyrics, Manson's hairstyle was awesome). It was an era I wish he would have sort of grown with instead of doing EMDM (I can't count Lest We Forget). The Ozzfest tour and headling shows I went to were a blast. The album itself is flawless for me beginning to end. For an album without Twiggy, I was apprehensive. Skold was a perfect replacement. I wish this album would not go forgotten with the current setlist, but with Twiggy back, I understand.



  3. #23
    Amputated Limbo ThreeEyedGod's Avatar
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    I'll rain on the parade and just crudely remark that I just feel this album sucks it. Ok, I will admit that it has grown on me a little more in the past couple of years and has gotten many more listens than when it initially came out, but nowhere near as the rest of his releases; no, not even EMDM. Sure there are some great tracks such as TGAoG, Spade, and Slutgarden, but the albums just falls apart so badly towards the end it is a sad affair. This is the one time I feel Manson completely failed to deliver on his own hype. That is all.

  4. #24
    Saint of Hades S.Hal0mega.B's Avatar
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Thank you for posting this SD. I have felt the same way for a long time regarding every single word you wrote. Sure, I skimmed through this thread just to give my opinion.

    To me the album is conceptual. I choose to believe it is about a character, perhaps the Arch Dandy. So, Arch begins with this idea of being a rebel, as covered by Holy Wood - though this is an entirely different approach story wise:

    Holy Wood features as we know it, the growing up of a boy into a rockstar rebelling against the 'hollow' of Hollywood, and in the end he finds himself just as hollow. That said, there are other stories to that album but i'll simply leave it at that since it is only what relates to the Golden Age of Grotesque's Arch Dandy.

    The Arch Dandy is a rebel. He lives each day like there is no tomorrow. He produces vitrol and becomes something of a underground taboo/old school (20's - 30's) star of sorts - though this is is also a commentary on his fans and how a lot of them see him as of present. Like Manson has said, the album is a movie. So to continue, the Arch Dandy is eventually transformed into a product (hence the mickey mouse gander) by concluding with the Death of Art.

    Though throughout this transformation the Arch does describe his twisted confusion between whether he's aware or not of the possibility of 3 sources of his transformation into the product. 1 references the women, Golden Age of Grotesque, Slutgarden, Spade, Paranoiac (Sorry i forgot how to spell that) and perhaps one more i cant recall.

    There's Drugs 2 - Kaboom Kaboom, Doll Daga Buzz Buzz Zigity, mObscene, S'aint, etc.

    And the third lay in all remaining songs, though hinted at sometimes in the above mentioned tracks.

    That there is my conclusion.

    Seeing that GAOG tour was the first time i saw him in 03, and I loved how into it the audience was simply because in my mind i saw it as a joke, a self parody and a prediction of him driving toward that black void where he felt for a long time after that tour that he was empty - empty in the sense of the fact that he may of convinced himself too much to the point of feeling like he had nothing left in music/art - this was possibly there because he portrayed the Arch Dandy on stage, in real life during that era (life is his art, and vice versa equals the why of this).

    I sincerely loved the DVD that came with it, it showed me a man who was loosing his interest in art all together and to him, that is life.

    I have many more thoughts but I am really happy you made this Thread SD. I made a simular one back in 2003 and the fans attacked me like hell, i didnt come back til 2008 to find that their (not to speak for all of you guys, as most of the assholes are still lost back at the heirophant void) tempers had cooled. This is also one of the reasons why i dont post much, but I always enjoy reading your ganders into each of his works.

    Thank you.

    S.Hal0mega.B


    "Our less well-developed physical senses, vis-a-vis our limited perception of the electromagnetic spectrum, aka reality - would be responsible for our reliance on reality and all that we define by it."
    'Joelle'

  5. #25
    RevManz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    lolz, finally a thread about the underrated, excellent album.

    For me, this is just an amazing piece of work. Guitars and keyboards, where the keyboards get more of an interesting highlight. The album came out great. I just love This is the New Shit, as it's my favorite off of it; (s)aint's a close second however.

    The concept behind the whole album was fun, dealing with degenerate art, and early Germany. Just captured the vaudville and burlesque perfectly, as it seemed, as well. Absolutely loved the imagery during this album era as well.
    Going with that, it almost felt like one of their earlier releases...

    best album, tied with Holywood. :D

  6. #26

    Join Date: 06.21.09
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    I think The Golden Age of Grotesque was a brilliant piece of work. It was the first "era" in the Manson history that I became a part of, checking frequently the site for updates and waiting with anticipation for any new revalation from the mind of the Arch Dandy.

    I was 14 years old. I had just gotten into Manson about a year earlier with Holywood being the first Manson record I had bought.

    At the time, I was not at all in tune with the depth of art that is Marilyn Manson. Be it lyrically, musically, conceptually, and etc.

    I remember not caring for GAOG under first listen...But there was something about it that dragged me in and it within the same month of purchase (and I bought it the day in came out...May 13th 2003 I believe) that it became my favourite record ever. I absolutely loved it. I saw Manson that summer on Ozzfest and then on the Grotesk Burlesk. It is, to this day, my favourite Manson tour concert. I think the live show was the best he had ever had, surpassing anything from the tryptich.

    I grew more and more involved with the the concept and DaDaism and the vocabulary of the album. I still wish to this day that he would put out a dvd of that tour.

    In retrospect, I could see how alot of fans may be put off by it coming out after Holy Wood and all. It was a VERY different record. But then again, all his records are different.

    GOAG will always hold a special place with me. I remember The Oracle and the Journal entrys. I remember the build up. It was a really magical time.


    Lately, I havnt thought much about it. I havnt listened to it in quite some time. Not for any real reason. It's strange. It's as if I forgot about for awhile. It was my favourite Manson record for years. I'm really glad this thread was made as well. I've never understood the hatred for the album. I felt like no one understood it. No one understood the sense of humor and the amazing lyrical style. It really opened Manson up in some ways. I feel like he yet again proved himself as a great artsit with it.

    If at times it sounds over produced, it may be that it was supposed to be. Keep in mind this is a record centered around the Big Band era. The ball rooms were full with a waltzing crowd. Flappers arrived with cocaine and papperazi nazis. If you werent dancing, you were dead. Burlesque and vaudeville. Tod Browning's Freaks.

    There is alot to take in with this album.


    I suspect he doesnt peform much of the songs live because of the obvious Dita reference and memories. Same goes for EAT ME, DRINK ME except instead of Dita, it was Evan.

    It's a good thing he's doesnt have bad feelings about Traci Lords, Rose McGowen or Missi.....Otherwise we may not have ANY of the Tryptich/SMC


    I'm going to go give this record a listen right now. This thread brought back alot of great memories and as I said it was in alot of ways the album that shaped and changed my early teen years. I'm 21 now and I love the record just as I did when back in 2003.

    I think in time people will learn to appreciate EMDM too. It seems everyone always hates the "new" record. I dont get it. It's nothing new though. Everyone hated MA when it came out.


    It's good to see these albums getting the recognition they deserve. And I hope Manson will put out a new record in the not too far future that goes back to dealing with concepts and time periods.

    And just a final thought on the subjuct. Looking back, I am amazed at how amazing Manson is. Who could pull off what he did? He changed the way he talked, dressed, wrote, acted, looked, and sounded for this era, as well as previous eras. I mean he wore zoot suits and totally and complete BECAME whatever he felt he had to to stay in character with the current album's plot and story line. He's a truely wonderful actor and artist.

  7. #27
    Saint of Hades S.Hal0mega.B's Avatar
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Quote Originally Posted by M Tragedy666
    I think The Golden Age of Grotesque was a brilliant piece of work. It was the first "era" in the Manson history that I became a part of, checking frequently the site for updates and waiting with anticipation for any new revalation from the mind of the Arch Dandy.

    I was 14 years old. I had just gotten into Manson about a year earlier with Holywood being the first Manson record I had bought.

    At the time, I was not at all in tune with the depth of art that is Marilyn Manson. Be it lyrically, musically, conceptually, and etc.

    I remember not caring for GAOG under first listen...But there was something about it that dragged me in and it within the same month of purchase (and I bought it the day in came out...May 13th 2003 I believe) that it became my favourite record ever. I absolutely loved it. I saw Manson that summer on Ozzfest and then on the Grotesk Burlesk. It is, to this day, my favourite Manson tour concert. I think the live show was the best he had ever had, surpassing anything from the tryptich.

    I grew more and more involved with the the concept and DaDaism and the vocabulary of the album. I still wish to this day that he would put out a dvd of that tour.

    In retrospect, I could see how alot of fans may be put off by it coming out after Holy Wood and all. It was a VERY different record. But then again, all his records are different.

    GOAG will always hold a special place with me. I remember The Oracle and the Journal entrys. I remember the build up. It was a really magical time.


    Lately, I havnt thought much about it. I havnt listened to it in quite some time. Not for any real reason. It's strange. It's as if I forgot about for awhile. It was my favourite Manson record for years. I'm really glad this thread was made as well. I've never understood the hatred for the album. I felt like no one understood it. No one understood the sense of humor and the amazing lyrical style. It really opened Manson up in some ways. I feel like he yet again proved himself as a great artsit with it.

    If at times it sounds over produced, it may be that it was supposed to be. Keep in mind this is a record centered around the Big Band era. The ball rooms were full with a waltzing crowd. Flappers arrived with cocaine and papperazi nazis. If you werent dancing, you were dead. Burlesque and vaudeville. Tod Browning's Freaks.

    There is alot to take in with this album.


    I suspect he doesnt peform much of the songs live because of the obvious Dita reference and memories. Same goes for EAT ME, DRINK ME except instead of Dita, it was Evan.

    It's a good thing he's doesnt have bad feelings about Traci Lords, Rose McGowen or Missi.....Otherwise we may not have ANY of the Tryptich/SMC


    I'm going to go give this record a listen right now. This thread brought back alot of great memories and as I said it was in alot of ways the album that shaped and changed my early teen years. I'm 21 now and I love the record just as I did when back in 2003.

    I think in time people will learn to appreciate EMDM too. It seems everyone always hates the "new" record. I dont get it. It's nothing new though. Everyone hated MA when it came out.


    It's good to see these albums getting the recognition they deserve. And I hope Manson will put out a new record in the not too far future that goes back to dealing with concepts and time periods.

    And just a final thought on the subjuct. Looking back, I am amazed at how amazing Manson is. Who could pull off what he did? He changed the way he talked, dressed, wrote, acted, looked, and sounded for this era, as well as previous eras. I mean he wore zoot suits and totally and complete BECAME whatever he felt he had to to stay in character with the current album's plot and story line. He's a truely wonderful actor and artist.

    I very much agree with your view on TGAOG, i experienced it in all ways very much the same. Though I cannot pick a favourite amongst tours or albums. I believe fans should really see (and i know, as we all know that some- some here see this...) that his work does change for each LP. A lot hate the new LP whatever it may be when it comes out but grow to like it, but these thoughts besides... its the unpredictability that makes me so antsy and joyous when i know there's a new LP coming out.

    Great work too 666, pointing out the details i missed in my post above, discussing the need of the over production and all the little p'nazis etc.

    I found myself laughing my ass of in some sort of psychotic hype when i first heard 'this is the new shit' , and like you and I have mentioned in both of our posts, I know we know entirely why :D

    Thankyou too all, great thread.


    "Our less well-developed physical senses, vis-a-vis our limited perception of the electromagnetic spectrum, aka reality - would be responsible for our reliance on reality and all that we define by it."
    'Joelle'

  8. #28

    Join Date: 09.12.09
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    i love this album. the word play is genius, i love how sophisticated he sounds, This Is the New Shit gives me chills, it's a brilliant piece of work. same with mOBSCENE, (s)AINT, and the Golden Age of Grotesque. the rest of the songs are fun, too and i especially love Spade and Slutgarden. this album will always have a special place in my heart, and for some odd reason i feel it's in a place far away from my love for Mechanical Animals or Antichrist Superstar. it's more uplifting in a way... definitely inspiring.

    also interesting for me to think about Manson possibly retiring from music altogether after it and taking it in context as his last record for a while and the statement he wanted to leave the world at the time.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Quote Originally Posted by GroupofOne
    also interesting for me to think about Manson possibly retiring from music altogether after it and taking it in context as his last record for a while and the statement he wanted to leave the world at the time.
    Exactly, a great point to bring up. This album, and more specifically Doppelherz, was meant to be his final output. It certainly puts it in a new light when you think about it in that way.
    My avatar looks like a mix of NIN, My Chemical Romance, and Chris Vrenna

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    I think to clarify, Manson didn't put out GAoG when he was thinking of dropping out of the music biz. I believe this change came after the fact - and led up to LWF's release. At the time of GAOG, Manson was 100% behind his music/band/art.

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