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Thread: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

  1. #31

    Join Date: 06.21.09
    Location: Chicago, Illinois
    Posts: 717
    Rank: Crimson Soil

    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Quote Originally Posted by Cringeon
    I think to clarify, Manson didn't put out GAoG when he was thinking of dropping out of the music biz. I believe this change came after the fact - and led up to LWF's release. At the time of GAOG, Manson was 100% behind his music/band/art.

    Was it? Doppleherz was included with the first 100,000 or so copies of GAOG and I believe it said after the video was played that this was to be his greatest and final piece of work...or something of those lines.

    I know he wasnt very vocal about thoughts on retirement during the GAOG...only 10 months or so after the fact and through the LWF period, but Doppleherz was indeed a part of GAOG...

    I don't think just because he thought about retiring that would mean that he wasnt 100% behind his music/band/art. Maybe he was more into it than at ANY other time, because he thought it would have been his final piece and wanted to leave the world with a bang...


    Thoughts?

  2. #32
    Saint of Hades S.Hal0mega.B's Avatar
    Join Date: 06.22.09
    Location: brain
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    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Well my thoughts 666 are that he felt that way with himself playing characters instead of being himself. It could also be that although he was 100 percent still behind all his art and music in focus, he felt at breaking point, as the dvd and album showed, but it also showed that he was discussing the death of art. The death of art possibly meant the death of his portrayal of conceptual characters either forever or it was simply just a statement based on his mind which was obviously explored well with Doppleherz (i never remember how to spell that).

    Anyhow, there's many assumptions, but the good thing is after all, all his albums a genuine and that there is why i dont bother to pick a favourite, as i like his honesty, even if its portrayed through the mask of Adam, Arch Dandy, Omega, Antichrist superstar and so on. We may know one day.

    But good question nethertheless 666


    "Our less well-developed physical senses, vis-a-vis our limited perception of the electromagnetic spectrum, aka reality - would be responsible for our reliance on reality and all that we define by it."
    'Joelle'

  3. #33

    Join Date: 09.12.09
    Posts: 19
    Rank: Brilliant Slut

    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Quote Originally Posted by Cringeon
    I think to clarify, Manson didn't put out GAoG when he was thinking of dropping out of the music biz. I believe this change came after the fact - and led up to LWF's release. At the time of GAOG, Manson was 100% behind his music/band/art.
    true, but keep in mind when you make an album you never know if it's going to be your last or what's going to happen later in your life, and the Golden Age has a large amount of songs. who knows if he went in to it thinking it may be his last and he wants to make it the final mindfuck.
    when you put out your greatest hits and retire shortly after, i'm sure he thought hard about what his last record contained, where he could go next, etc. and there's an amazing album, there wasn't too much more he could do unless he wanted to repeat what we already know he feels over and over again in slightly more epic ways. so he just fed on the Celebritarian Corporation while people pushed him to release another album.. then his divorce, Manson's 'Born Again', EAT ME, DRINK ME!

  4. #34

    Join Date: 06.21.09
    Location: Chicago, Illinois
    Posts: 717
    Rank: Crimson Soil

    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbMRWLTs ... re=related

    Give this a look! Should bring back some wonderful memories. The other parts are there too.

  5. #35
    secretsquirrely's Avatar
    Join Date: 06.20.09
    Location: Netherlands
    Posts: 356
    Rank: Glass Jaw

    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    Honestly I've always had a bit of a fondness for the Golden age. Was it as good as the Triptych? Well..no. But it was the rebirth of Marilyn Manson after a hugely long absence, and I was very happy about that. It also didn't hurt that I was 17 or so when the album came out and it helped me vent a lot of teenage angst. I do agree that certain tracks came across "silly" or "childish" as said before, but overall the album has always held strong with me.

    I still state that mOBSCENE is one of my favorite tracks from Manson along with Kaboom, Kaboom and Slutgarden. I thought the imagery was so different from anything the band had ever done that it became some sort of beast. I loved it so much...ok so I do feel that a lot of the Nazi imagery and such has been stretched to its thinnest and used way too much now with Manson, but oh well..back then it really punched everyone in the gut and suited the theme. I was not all too pleased with the sudden change of sound provided by Skold though. Certain tracks were great (as stated before) but songs such as This Is the New Shit and Better of Two Evils were just way under par to what the band and Manson himself could do. Also certain career moves and choices for singles were not too pleasing for me.

    All in all The Golden Age of Grotesque was fun for me though. They were setting up a new concept that was pretty strong and kept Manson alive and known for what he has always been known for..concept and imagery. This was the last era we've had with a substantial show and imagery behind it. I'd say that Skold's inclusion in the band was the beginning of the downfall for the imagery. I know most people say "sound over imagery" but that's not the case with Marilyn Manson. The 2 go hand in hand..and I have to say that with EMDM not only did the imagery get the big shaft, so did the sound.

    This latest album, High End of Low, is a return to form when it comes to sound, but I'm still waiting for the conceptual albums to emerge again. Golden Age of the Grotesque was a fantastic era and from what I've heard one of the bets shows the band has delivered live.

    Here's to hoping that after THEOL Manson decides to pick up where Golden Age left off and bring us into the era of Celebritarianism.


    ...a..god..amongst..insects...

    in your dreams

  6. #36
    Mexicanfiend's Avatar
    Join Date: 06.20.09
    Location: México City, México.
    Posts: 820
    Rank: Crimson Soil

    Default Re: Unsung praise for The Golden Age of Grotesque

    As Cringeon stated already , I have a love/hate relationship with this album as well.

    This album came in a moment in which everything in my life was changing and, well... let's say that bright times were beginning to arise. I was just starting college, and The Golden Age of Grotesque was the first MM album that I was able to go and buy, put it on my stereo and blast it at an ungodly volume after a 4-year Manson forbideness at my house. When the radio played mOBSCENE, This Is The New Shit and Doll-Dagga-Buzz-Buzz-ziggety-Zag a month and a half before the official release, my hopes were really high about it.

    However, the day it came out I was too drunk to even think about going to buy it. I always took that little detail as a bad sign.

    I got it the day after and I thought it was OK. mOBSCENE was my favourite video from that year, This Is The New Shit was my song of that year and I enjoyed most of the songs. In fact, the ones that I didn't really like were the title track, Para-Noir and Vodevil. They seemed weak material from such a great band like MM, at that time.

    But I always felt that it lacked something. I can't blame Twiggy's departure or Skold's contribution because I think that's a futile discussion. It is something deeper and personal that I haven't been able to identify yet. That album is good, but didn't hooked me the way every other MM release has hooked me.

    When I began to respect the album more was when I read about all the influences surrounding the album concepts. There's when I got more respect from that album.

    To this day, I don't catalogue it as the "worst MM album ever" because, apart from a subjective and personal opinion, I enjoy most of its songs. It is perhaps the only album that has 3+ songs that I can skip and also the one I listen to the less. Nothing more.

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