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Thread: The Long Hard Road Out Of Hell

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIETOMORROW View Post

    As far as having Manson's name on the cover of an album but not having Manson create the whole thing, remember, Marilyn Manson is also a band (although one could argue against that point now) so having Manson's name on the cover doesn't explicity suggest the MAN created the album. So it's a bit different.
    Exactly.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIETOMORROW View Post
    Here's an interesting interview Neil Strauss did for the 15th anniversary of Antichrist Superstar where he talks about the creation of the book.
    Don't get me wrong, I know what a ghost writer does, I'd just still argue that Manson's investment in The Long Hard Road Out Of Hell was more full-on than the other examples you used. There's sections of The Dirt - which I've probably read as many times as ...Hell - where it's clearly eight paragraphs of embellishment on what was likely a two sentence anecdote from Vince Neil. That interview with Strauss says exactly what I'd expect it to, which is basically that it was his job to bolster the wealth of information Manson gave him, whilst simultaneously structuring it next to original chapters Manson penned himself.

    As far as having Manson's name on the cover of an album but not having Manson create the whole thing, remember, Marilyn Manson is also a band (although one could argue against that point now) so having Manson's name on the cover doesn't explicity suggest the MAN created the album. So it's a bit different.
    I don't reckon. Manson may be one singular person, but the process of 'Marilyn Manson' is an overall occurrence defined by his image, or presence. I think he guides the creative process, encouraging others to express themselves, but when it's under the mantle of 'Marilyn Manson', it's geared towards representing his vision. With the exception of John 5 and Twiggy's time outside of the band, that may well be why former members of Marilyn Manson rarely produce anything worthwhile after leaving.

    I also agree that it would be interesting to see what another biography would reveal. Maybe he'll still do the one rumoured from a few years ago, time will tell.
    "the Serpent was more crafty than any beast of the field which
    the LORD god had made
    "

    m e m e n t o m o r i . p o s t m o r t e m


  3. #23
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    I've been re-reading every so often since high school, always been a favorite of mine. I think he should write an updated version, but there's a brilliant sense moral ambiguity to how it ends - you know, right as his life is getting infinitely more turbulent. Perhaps this is more suited to the analysis forum, come to think of it...

    At any rate, it's a great read. I like his short stories and poetry a lot.

  4. #24

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    Well since Manson couldn't play an instrument and didn't know how to sing either I seriously doubt he had full control of the musical process back when the band was young. He has full control over the creative process now, but in the period when his book was written MM was still a band and everyone wrote their own parts, Manson just wrote the lyrics but he had a lot of musical guidance from his band members who actually knew how to play instruments and from Trent Reznor, his original producer. He may be the most involved in the band's projected image and their lyrical concepts on each album, but that doesn't mean he was the main musical force of the group like he is these days.

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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrganGrinder89 View Post
    Well since Manson couldn't play an instrument and didn't know how to sing either I seriously doubt he had full control of the musical process back when the band was young. He has full control over the creative process now, but in the period when his book was written MM was still a band and everyone wrote their own parts, Manson just wrote the lyrics but he had a lot of musical guidance from his band members who actually knew how to play instruments and from Trent Reznor, his original producer. He may be the most involved in the band's projected image and their lyrical concepts on each album, but that doesn't mean he was the main musical force of the group like he is these days.
    i believe marilyn played an instrument on ACSS
    and he probably had more control over the music
    than what some might believe

    and i could argue that he did know how to sing

    "I'm a strip, strip, strip, and I flicker, flick, flick, flick
    A flicker of celluloid and there's holes, holes, holes
    In my everything"


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  8. #26
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    I just finished it.
    "We were too dumb to run, too dead to die."

  9. #27
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    I read and reread it several times when I was a teenager getting into Manson, I think it had a bigger impact on me than the music itself. Reading these crazy stories about a person and a lifestyle so different from my own was a cataclysmic shift in my worldview.

    The first time I read it was on a family vacation and the girlfriend of my step brother read a couple of pages, she made a big thing about how I shouldn't be reading something from someone as sick as Manson, I never asked but to this day I still lay awake in bed wondering what specific part of the book she read.

    I always wished the book went into more detail of the actual work he did and that it wasn't almost only focused on his life story though.
    Last edited by Absolution; 10-20-2017 at 01:54 AM.

  10. #28
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    I read it once years ago. I might sometimes look back at it for reference or to remember what he said about someone, but i'll instantly get stuck in it and want to re-read it. Haven't read it for the second time yet.
    Memento Mori
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  12. #29
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    I first read it when I was like 12 or 13 in junior high. It prompted a discussion in my english class because my teacher was very Christian and was interested in learning about him. This was in like the early 2000s so it wasn't at the height of his career or anything, I believe the Grotestk Burlesque tour had just drawn to a close.

    So it was pretty funny when we all crowded around the book and that image he drew of the guy with the bondage gear and dildos came up.

  13. #30
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    Thinking about the book, now and having read Tom Wolfe. Long Hard Road now comes across to me or is heavily influenced by New Journalism.

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