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Thread: Retrospective: The Golden Age Of Grotesque

  1. #21
    YoureAlreadyHere's Avatar
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    My favorite visual is manson on stilts next to the elephant... maybe its my love for Dali



    I love this album, and it was my first Manson album gifted to me at the age of 13-
    I loved the sheer confidence because it was saturated in this depraved new world- post love, post fame, post green; of course my teenage self mused over the album, without pause. It was fast- both lyrically and musically; it was raw & graphic, no bars; it was playful in a snide way any lover of sarcasm could relate to; poetic & full of puns; the imagery was a display of artwork all on its own. ... ..

    I'll always love the album, every song having its own facets that I adore.

    for funsies, my first self portrait showcases my MM GAOG necklace. =P
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    Don't tell me what to do.

  2. #22
    Strange & Unusual Sinner Halo Infinity's Avatar
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    The Golden Age of Grotesque has certainly been a lot better than I remembered it this time around. Some tracks that weren't my favorites when I first listened to it, are now favorites. I would've never guessed, as I actually used to skip The Golden Age of Grotesque, Ka-boom Ka-boom and Spade. It also reminds me why some albums definitely need time to be appreciated. And not that I didn't appreciate it back then either, but it has certainly aged very well to me. It's also one of those Marilyn Manson albums that I can listen to from start to finish in order. (Or most of it in that way for that matter. That's one of the ways for me to determine whether an album is a favorite or not.)

    And well, this thread would seem just a bit incomplete without at least just one actual post of Doppelherz. And so, well, here you go. Have fun.

    Last edited by Halo Infinity; 04-12-2017 at 06:51 PM.

  3. #23
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    It was, to me and many many others, a disappointment upon release and marked the beginning of a slump that he's yet to climb out of. It was very weak - lyrically, musically, visually - compared to what had come before. And if anything I like it less today than when it was new. It has some good songs, but they're held back by the lyrics and production.

    I actually really like Skold's solo stuff and his work with KMFDM, but his MM work just never clicked for me.

  4. #24
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    I will always have special feelings for TGAOG, since it's the very beginning of my worship of MM. I had known TGAOG by heart before I listened to any other MM album. One of my favorite memories is coming back from school with a simmering frustration and fury, playing "Better of Two Evils" as loud as I could, and imagining myself singing it in front of all those kids who were bullying me and spreading vicious rumors about me. The badass spirit of TGAOG really helped me cope with all the bullying I experienced. I would have killed myself without it. That was the first (but not the last) time that MM saved my life.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.D. View Post
    No, I haven't tactically missed out EAT ME, DRINK ME, although I do look forward to discussing that at some point soon, maybe we'll even try something on Provider Module next year when it's a decade old.
    Anyway, I was listening to This Is The New Shit this afternoon, and the following thought occurred. No enormous retro-review of the record (yet), just a notion that I wanted to share, and hopefully encourage others to add their recollections, ideas, and impressions of the album after thirteen years or so.

    Is there a funnier Manson lyric than "Now it's 'you know who', I got the 'you know what'. I stick it 'you know where', you know why, you don't care..."?

    It might even sum up The Golden Age Of Grotesque more effectively than any other critique; meaningless, instantly recognisable, risqué sloganeering that's both direct and ambiguous at the same time. I think Manson's aim with the album was danceable, radio-friendly noise pollution with no real agenda other than to amplify things he'd already said, using hyperbolic, cartoon versions of himself to do so. It's essentially 'Meta' pop music before that term became widely used. A polarising album for some, although arguably the first time he and his band had been having real fun since Smells Like Children. Definitely dance music for the damned.
    I think that line you quoted sums up HIM. We all know who and what he has, where he's gonna stick it and we've no clue why and don't gaf.

  6. #26
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    Overwhelming, unexpected desire to revisit this whole album again in its entirety this morning. It was a wise choice.

    I'd posit that Born Villain and Heaven Upside Down have the most in common with this record since its release, even if the recording of ...Villain wasn't so much fun for Manson, I think the over-arching sound, observance of different genres, confidence and presentation of all three albums is similar.
    I think besides his dandy suits during Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals, The Golden Age Of Grotesque was an era that gave a lot of Manson's fans inspiration and support to dress how they wanted and not be afraid to experiment along the way. I thought perhaps Manson's claims of bringing Vaudeville into people's living rooms and onto the street were a little bold at the time, in a sea of Nu-Metal it was hard to see how that would find its feet, but it definitely worked, even within his own fan base.

    Lovely, fun album still.

    Oh, and during a year where Mechanical Animals turns twenty, The Golden Age Of Grotesque is fifteen. Both albums still sound like they were recorded yesterday. That's where the baggy-trousers types fucked up; hardly any of them released music that could've been from any other time than 1999-2003. Many of his contemporaries or airwave-sharers have dated poorly, but Manson's records generally improve with age.
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  7. #27
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    The first time I heard this album,was the day it was released. I was hanging out with this sketch guy who dressed like he was a member of Orgy and was a beautiful disaster. When I got in his car that afternoon,he mentioned he picked up the album and we listened the whole way back to his house. "Spade" stuck out to me more than I imagined when we ate 25 shroom caps each because neither of us had before and all I can recall is this album was the soundtrack of my mind during this "journey" Being a creative /artistic minded gal , I thought everything would be different on a trip. I was gravely mistaken. The apartment carpet swayed like wheat in the wind. I saw things behind my eyes that were not projecting before me. None of our other friends would come by to guide us and instead told us to go look in a mirror. ((Assholes!)) I started to really freak out. He started to melt. I tried the normal panic remedies to laughably "bring myself down" eating crackers which was actually just spitting them everywhere and splashing my face with water and in closing my eyes, I could hear "Spade" over and over and inside my eyes this odd chipmunk was laughing at me. Shit was bleak, he started to really go balls deep in a bad trip so my mom had to drive an hour to come rescue us, I was 17. It was a memorable night. I have loved this album so much , From that hilariously tragic night, on. Each album truly sets a perfect soundtrack through my memories. The first being Smells Like Children which my cool cousin and I obsessively listened to in secret and freaking out about what we had found.
    Last edited by HOWLANDOWL; 01-08-2018 at 06:11 PM. Reason: Mistake

  8. #28
    HOWLANDOWL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.D. View Post
    Overwhelming, unexpected desire to revisit this whole album again in its entirety this morning. It was a wise choice.

    I'd posit that Born Villain and Heaven Upside Down have the most in common with this record since its release, even if the recording of ...Villain wasn't so much fun for Manson, I think the over-arching sound, observance of different genres, confidence and presentation of all three albums is similar.
    I think besides his dandy suits during Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals, The Golden Age Of Grotesque was an era that gave a lot of Manson's fans inspiration and support to dress how they wanted and not be afraid to experiment along the way. I thought perhaps Manson's claims of bringing Vaudeville into people's living rooms and onto the street were a little bold at the time, in a sea of Nu-Metal it was hard to see how that would find its feet, but it definitely worked, even within his own fan base.

    Lovely, fun album still.

    Oh, and during a year where Mechanical Animals turns twenty, The Golden Age Of Grotesque is fifteen. Both albums still sound like they were recorded yesterday. That's where the baggy-trousers types fucked up; hardly any of them released music that could've been from any other time than 1999-2003. Many of his contemporaries or airwave-sharers have dated poorly, but Manson's records generally improve with age.
    I whole heartedly agree that his albums stand the test of time. Mechanical Animals was and is such an echo to me. It takes me back but feels fresh and relative. It holds such an all encompassing burst of feeling mixed with memory. GAOG has the same effect. Fun, emotional, and groundbreaking for the era in which it was released. Not a lot of artists hit you with a catalog that can coincide with what you make it. For me it is a grand soundtrack of thought processes / mood ring from my own life. If that makes any sense at all? I just feel very lucky to have all these releases happen throughtout points in my life where it buries a memory of then, but can come through and express a feeling now.
    Last edited by HOWLANDOWL; 01-08-2018 at 06:31 PM. Reason: Add

  9. #29
    MissioMafia Nemoris Inferioris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.D. View Post
    .

    Oh, and during a year where Mechanical Animals turns twenty, The Golden Age Of Grotesque is fifteen. Both albums still sound like they were recorded yesterday. That's where the baggy-trousers types fucked up; hardly any of them released music that could've been from any other time than 1999-2003. Many of his contemporaries or airwave-sharers have dated poorly, but Manson's records generally improve with age.
    I think so too. That's what detaches Manson from other bands of his time. His albums don't seem to date themselves. As you wouldn't be able to tell if MA or TGAOG were recorded either in the 90s, 00s, or even now. And they age incredibly well. Unlike most 90s bands who have a very dated (Yet, Nostalgic) sound. Possibly due to the lyrical subjects. Recording process/ Sound quality, etc. The lyrics of TGAOG are more relevant now than they were then, and even MA seems like it could be released years from now. As if they're timeless, or ahead of their time.
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  10. #30
    Enname's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HOWLANDOWL View Post
    The first time I heard this album,was the day it was released. I was hanging out with this sketch guy who dressed like he was a member of Orgy and was a beautiful disaster. When I got in his car that afternoon,he mentioned he picked up the album and we listened the whole way back to his house. "Spade" stuck out to me more than I imagined when we ate 25 shroom caps each because neither of us had before and all I can recall is this album was the soundtrack of my mind during this "journey" Being a creative /artistic minded gal , I thought everything would be different on a trip. ... It was a memorable night. I have loved this album so much , From that hilariously tragic night, on. Each album truly sets a perfect soundtrack through my memories. The first being Smells Like Children which my cool cousin and I obsessively listened to in secret and freaking out about what we had found.
    Fabulous memory in retrospect, and what a way to make sure Spade sticks for life. First time I heard it was a lot more boring, but nonetheless made sure it was ingrained in my memory. I was stuck on a bus for 26 hours after having bought the album, and to drown out the endless repeats of Fawlty Towers looping on the bus' video (I like it, but not for 26 hours) I put Golden Age of the Grotesque on very loudly and stared fixedly out the window watching the day fade to night and back again. My hearing was shot by the time I reached London, but my entire memory of that period is shaded in the vivid hot vaudevillian flashes of colour that makes up the guitar and sound scape of that album. To this day, long road journeys and Golden Age of the Grotesque go hand in hand for me, even if I am not watching blackness leach into the flat plains of Normandy.


    Quote Originally Posted by S.D. View Post
    Overwhelming, unexpected desire to revisit this whole album again in its entirety this morning. It was a wise choice.

    I thought perhaps Manson's claims of bringing Vaudeville into people's living rooms and onto the street were a little bold at the time, in a sea of Nu-Metal it was hard to see how that would find its feet, but it definitely worked, even within his own fan base.

    Lovely, fun album still.
    Helps that (and this is from footage, not experience) the life shows for this were superb and sold the Grotesque Vaudeville in all its material glory.
    Quid ignorantia sit multi ignorant.

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